TERRIBLE SIGHT: Dead koala on the Tin Can Bay Road near Laminex this week. Drivers are urged to slow down and take care.
TERRIBLE SIGHT: Dead koala on the Tin Can Bay Road near Laminex this week. Drivers are urged to slow down and take care.

4th koala in 7 weeks killed on Tin Can Bay Rd

MOTORISTS on the Tin Can Bay Rd have been urged to slow down after the fourth koala in less than two months was hit and killed by a car last night.

A member of the Koala Action Gympie Region group was called to the scene near Laminex after the young male koala was spotted in the grass on the side of the road; he was the fourth young male koala to die after being hit by a car on that road since August 22.

Two other koalas were found by locals and one by a Gympie ambulance, KAGR co-ordinator Michelle Daly said this morning.

Dead koala on the Tin Can Bay Road near Laminex
TERRIBLE SIGHT: Dead koala on the Tin Can Bay Road near Laminex this week. Drivers are urged to slow down and take care.

The Tin Can Bay Rd between Tinana Creek and Priddy Rd is already a hotspot for koalas being hit by cars and there are vehicle activated flashing signs in breeding season there.

Sadly, though, a koala was killed between those signs on September 24, and found by Gympie ambos returning from coast.

Two koalas have been struck and killed near Laminex, and a fourth koala was found dead on August 22 near Ross Creek at Goomboorian.

If you do hit a koala while driving, or you see a dead koala on the road, koala advocates have asked motorists to stop and check it (unless it is unsafe to do so) and always call a wildlife rescue service and provide location details for them to attend.

Female koalas and other marsupials such as kangaroos and wallabies may have a joey in the pouch or a young one nearby. The koala may have an ear tag to identify it, or it may be well known to a local resident due to its markings.

The data gathered helps information on points of impact and the causes of death an injury is essential to waving vulnerable species - the koala is on the threatened species list.

Have several rescue numbers in your phone, such as Gympie ANARRA Wildlife Hotline 54849111, and RSPCA's 1300ANIMAL (1300264625).