Cameron Bancroft (from left), Steve Smith and David Warner are serving their bans for ball tampering despite a report finding Cricket Australia should also share the blame.
Cameron Bancroft (from left), Steve Smith and David Warner are serving their bans for ball tampering despite a report finding Cricket Australia should also share the blame.

Should cricket bans be lifted after damning report?

CRICKET Australia's new chief executive Kevin Roberts has reaffirmed his commitment to working with the players despite a lacklustre response to the cultural survey.

Only 29 per cent of current Australian cricketers chose to have their say in the Ethics Centre's survey which formed the basis of Monday's damning 145-page report, but Roberts was far from put-off by the result.

"We would obviously hope to receive more responses than that," Roberts said this morning.

"But that was the players' call. What I can say is when I engage with players in this new role, I'll be engaging with 100 per cent of them."

The Australian Cricketers' Association will address the media in response to the Cricket Australia culture review later today.

Association president Greg Dyer and association CEO Alistair Nicholson are expected to call for the softening of ball tampering bans hanging over the heads of Steve Smith, David Warner and Cameron Bancroft.

That push follows key findings in yesterday's report which determined the trio were not wholly responsible for what happened in Cape Town back in March.

The report found Cricket Australia's administration also should have born the brunt of consequences relating to the ball tampering scandal against South Africa.

Dyer and Nicholson will also be expected to address concerns around the lack of participation by players in the report survey.