Glen Hartwig
Glen Hartwig Tom Daunt

Councillor says new $150k Rattler bailout won't be the last

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Get back to basics

YES ratepayers, another Rattler bailout and in my opinion it won't be the last.

Based on the business case, Amamoor was the least profitable option with a 30 per cent less spend passenger.

I know the Mayor has stated publicly that the Rattler "will be profitable”, it would be interesting to know how that can be achieved.

I am concerned that this commitment that it "will be profitable”, is similar to the "$10.8 million not a dollar more” commitment that was made at a public meeting at the Theebine Hall when asked about the total project cost.

CALL TO ACTION: Councillor Glen Hartwig says the Rattler project delay can be blamed solely on one person.
CALL TO ACTION: Councillor Glen Hartwig Renee Albrecht

Rural roads at present appear to have more in common with a Borneo jungle track than a developed country like Australia.

The simple truth in my opinion is that money spent on propping up council tourism ventures can not be utilised for slashing the roads edges or grading roads.

Time to get back to basics.

The recent Easter on Mary was an outstanding success.

Traders and council staff need to be congratulated for there effort and take pride in the success. For those residents that didn't attend, you missed out on a wonderful evening. Don't miss the upcoming Winter on Mary.

Parking is always a challenge for Mary Street and it is essential for council to look at ways to improve access to the street.

Without easy access Mary Street will always struggle to transition from the shopping hub of Gympie to a destination for relaxation, dining, entertainment and boutique shopping.

It is a beautiful street with a layout that creates challenges for future growth but with some innovative thinking opportunities can be created.

The Yabba Regatta has to get a mention.

In a short time the committee managed to put on a wonderful day of fun for the Valley community. To achieve around 3000 attendees in a six weeks time frame is a credit to the Valley spirit and the organisers efforts.

I hope Gympie gets behind this event next year and we triple the number of boats in the events. A special mention needs to go to the Imbildon Tennis Club for the water bombs that provide much fun for all.

The committee were especially grateful to the council staff that assisted in getting the town centre ready. Hard working and willing to help were comments mentioned more than once.

Glen Hartwig,

Gympie Regional Councillor Division 2

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Shocked and disappointed

I READ, with gradually declining interest, the letter by Tim Jerome, the Independent candidate for Wide Bay, under the heading "Don't mix Church and State” (The Gympie Times, Saturday, April 20).

Tim Jerome Wide Bay federal election candidate
Tim Jerome Wide Bay federal election candidate Contributed

The latter paragraphs were an attempt to establish that a vote for any candidate other than an independent was a vote wasted or, at least, mistakenly cast. No doubt an independent would want to promote such a view.

But I agree wholeheartedly with the basic principle that organised religion and politics should not be mixed.

And I was shocked and disappointed to read of the reported claim (by a Mr Sheldon) that Pastor Margaret Court is urging "all church leaders around Australia to support Scott Morrison and his party”. That, on the basis that Sco Mo is a Christian.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison greets veterans and current serving members of the Australian Defence Force at The Australian Hotel after the Anzac Day march in Townsville Thursday, April 25, 2019. (AAP Image/Mick Tsikas) NO ARCHIVING
Prime Minister Scott Morrison greets veterans and current serving members of the Australian Defence Force at The Australian Hotel after the Anzac Day march in Townsville Thursday, April 25, 2019. (AAP Image/Mick Tsikas) NO ARCHIVING MICK TSIKAS

Now, many of us remember that Margaret Court was our greatest ever female tennis player. But, while she enjoys the same freedom of expression as the rest of us, her credibility as a political analyst and societal futurist is that of the man or woman in the street.

In this Jan. 26, 2015 photo, Australian tennis great Margaret Court smiles during the official launch of the remodeled Margaret Court Arena at the Australian Open tennis championship in Melbourne. Former tennis great and now Christian pastor Court says she will stop using Qantas where possible in protest over the Australian airline's promotion of same-sex marriage. I am disappointed that Qantas has become an active promoter for same-sex marriage,
In this Jan. 26, 2015 photo, Australian tennis great Margaret Court smiles during the official launch of the remodeled Margaret Court Arena at the Australian Open tennis championship in Melbourne. Former tennis great and now Christian pastor Court says she will stop using Qantas where possible in protest over the Australian airline's promotion of same-sex marriage. I am disappointed that Qantas has become an active promoter for same-sex marriage," Perth resident Court said in the letter published Thursday, May 25, 2017, in The West Australian newspaper. (AP Photo/Vincent Thian) Vincent Thian

And, given that Australia is not a dictatorship, she should be applying the Christianity yardstick, not to a party leader, but to the policies he espouses. Policies that reflect such concepts as concern for fairness and justice, care for the young, the aged and the sick, the discouragement of greed and privilege and the provision of equality of opportunity for all.

I think Pastor Court would do well to let her fellow Australians make up their own minds.

Merv Welch,

The Palms

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A young dingo finds a meal in a shark, on the southern end of the eastern beach on Fraser Island. This unusual photo was captured by Sunshine Coast Daily photographer, Brett Wortman, on the trip home from the Toyota Fraser Island Fishing Expo.Photo Brett Wortman / Sunshine Coast Daily
A young dingo finds a meal in a shark, on the southern end of the eastern beach on Fraser Island. This unusual photo was captured by Sunshine Coast Daily photographer, Brett Wortman, on the trip home from the Toyota Fraser Island Fishing Expo.Photo Brett Wortman / Sunshine Coast Daily Brett Wortman

Fraser Island dingoes

DOES Fraser Island need the dingoes for a tourist attraction or does it have enough without them?

The photo of the dingo (The Gympie Times, April 23) displayed an animal that is starving. If a dog owner had an animal in that condition they would have the RSPCA on their doorstep.

It is not true caring to keep animals in that condition. If this is an example of the condition of the animals on the island than there is a overpopulation of them. That being the case they would also be devastating the rest of the wildlife on the island in order to survive. They could be fed but that would result in them becoming accustomed to an unnatural food source and they would increase in numbers with the result that the problem would remain.

May one suggest that, as brutal as it would seem to some, the only real solution is to cull there population to a level that can be (decently) sustained on the island and kept at that level.

A.L. Haack,

Pie Creek

Editor's Note: The photo which accompanied that article was a file photo of a Fraser Island dingo taken two years ago. We apologise for any confusion.

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Inept response a concern

WITHOUT Llew O'Brien's efforts, there would not have been so much as a squeak from either side of politics regarding the plight of Australia's dairy farmers.

However Labor's inept response in the form of yet another inquiry/commission into floor pricing is a concern.

Anybody with even a remote knowledge of marketing and finance would know that floor pricing will never work; but here we have such a scheme being supported by, of all people, a former agriculture minister.

I fear this is just another example of Labor's approach to the current election campaign.

A mishmash of poorly considered and largely uncosted policies designed to gather votes in the short term, regardless of the long term cost to working Australians who have saved to fund a comfortable retirement.

And no, I don't expect to see prime minister Shorten turning up to government house in an electric car any time soon.

By the way, could Jason Scanes please explain his opposition to the cashless debit card when it is a concept that Labor supports; and has recently voted for in parliament?

Greg Edwards,

Bells Bridge

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Palmer deal an insult

A VOTE for the LNP in the senate in Queensland is a vote to elect Clive Palmer.

The man who slept in the Chamber for three years as the Member for Fairfax. The man who shut down his Nickel refinery in Townsville throwing hundreds out of work, and leaving taxpayer, that is voters, to pay the $74 million owing to workers by Clive Palmer.

The man who closed the Hyatt at Coolum, costing hundred of jobs and creating an ongoing legal battle with property owners there.

The man who took his business to New Zealand and threatened to sue Australia.

It is a sad indictment on Scott Morrison that he is so desperate that he was stitched up a deal with Clive Palmer that will almost inevitably see Palmer in the Senate on LNP preferences.

It is an insult to people to all Australians as we were left paying the $74 million to workers that Palmer clearly has himself, and to regional Queenslanders who were treated like dirt by Palmer.

Joy Ringrose,

Pomona

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Where do councillors stand on flood levee?

THE easiest way not to get wet when it's raining is to stay out of the rain.

The best way to avoid flooding is not to own property in a swamp, not to try to fight nature by building a flood levee, as come up again this week when the question was asked of what to do "to save Gympie's CBD”.

I'm all for flood levees in places where there's no high ground to go to, places out west, Roma, Charleville etc. But when a town has its highest ground sitting largely wasted, when that ground is owned by the state, and when the suggested levee won't protect against what's known to be past flood levels (1893) the entire concept is dubious, at best.

The last time the levee was mentioned Gympie's Mayor, Curran, said he wouldn't rule it out, if there was a change of state government which would fund it.

The comment in the article this week, I missed who said it, claimed it was a 'NIMBY' effect which stopped the levee, a very false summation when the simple facts are that it doesn't add up financially, has an estimated yearly maintenance cost of about $500,000 and there's some doubts about the ability to pump out the amount of water which could collect inside the levee in the event of a flood such as 1992, when local rains were much heavier than the normally quoted 1999 river rise.

There is of course the question of what percentage of the broader population would benefit and a bigger question of how many of us actually care enough about those who made bad investment decisions to prop them up even further than we're constantly doing with spending around the CBD now?

In the absence of any official poll which would answer the question of if the general population would support such a huge spend and ongoing liability, and with the Mayor not definitive on the subject, I believe we should be hearing from the rest of our councillors as to where they stand on this.

There's an election for their positions in less than 12 months and as voters we should surely be allowed to know if those who seek re-election are willing to, again, chuck funds at the few which could be better used to help many more.

Dave Freeman,

Cedar Pocket

Green economics

THOSE familiar with the tragedy of North America's dustbowl will recall the folly of 1930's prairie farmers tilling the soil with little regard to land conservation and the vagaries of the weather. "Rain follows the plough", they said.

Thus it seems something of a paradox that our conservational Greens have adopted similar reasoning, substituting revenue for rain and expenditure for plough.

Richard Di Natale is still an advocate of the "money for nothing", universal basic income, despite the fact that Finland ended its disappointing trial last December.

Mehreen Faruqi promotes "Back to Whitlam" style, free TAFE and university but fails to link curricular with job prospects. Therefore, one presumes Star Trek aficionados could write "A History of the Klingon Speaking Peoples" as a taxpayer funded essay under this scheme.

Adam Bant champions free dental, but makes no mention of oral hygiene responsibilities.

Amy MacMahon speaks of virtually free public transport while motorists are still slugged with fuel excise, rego and tolls. So who's really paying?

Larissa Waters sabotages Adani but defends the mining super profits tax as a revenue stream.

I would urge all voters to cast a penetrating eye over the Greens website and see if you too, can separate utopia from dystopia. (Hint: Look for seeds of totalitarianism, hypocrisy, policy conflict and fiscal acuity.)

Some would say you couldn't make this stuff up, but I disagree.

Given the abundance of material, I am sure that any two-bit Hollywood director could turn the machinations of the Australian Greens into a Huxleyan block buster in no time flat.

I must confess it's going to take a little while before I have the confidence to give my vote to a Greenie from the "Latte Panhandle", and it has got nothing to do with a penchant for instant coffee.

Alan Dray,

Mooloo

Attack on farmers a global conspiracy

VEGAN activists continue to accuse animal farmers of cruelty, yet to date, despite their many attempts to record cruelty to animals on farms, they have failed totally to have any farmers charged with cruelty.

This is because farmers treat their animals well and comply with government and industry welfare rules.

If these people still believe that farm animals are treated cruelly, then they should attack the legislators, not the farmers, to try to change welfare rules.

Animals Australia was caught out offering money to crew members on live export ships to record animals in distress, a sure way to get people to deliberately create distress for financial reward.

It was no coincidence that the Aussie Farms attack map appeared just days later to take the heat off AA who went into silent mode.

The film 'Dominion' which is supposed to be their great achievement must have run out of steam.

Most of that film is irrelevant to Australian farming practices.

Its purpose was to undermine animal farming and progress the vegan cause. It has failed on both counts.

However, they still make money out of gullible people who think their money will be used to help animals.

The concerted attack on Australian farmers is part of a worldwide move to undermine national sovereignty in the name of global government.

John & Jenny Cameron,

'Woop Woop',

Lagoon Pocket

Easter ruined by gunfire

HOPE you had a family friendly, peaceful and enjoyable Easter.

Veteran is only 12km from town, so semi rural with homes on blocks from 2-40 acres. At least 12km is a quick run to town, not like living at Wavell Heights or Cooparoo in the city. It is a lifestyle choice.

Once upon a time Easter was a time of quiet, reflective and joyous. Our Easter was horrendous. We were not home on Good Friday, so cannot say.

But on Easter Saturday and Sunday we were subjected to shotgun firing for nearly six hours each day from a nearby farmlet.

We could see at least six and perhaps eight persons, presumably aiming at targets beneath a big tree.

It was extremely loud and reverberated up and down the valley.

We understand that the shooting was heard by numerous residents as far as North Deep Creek Rd and Wattle Lane, over a kilometre, perhaps more. That was one direction we know about.

We understand 000 was called twice, and a patrol ventured down Meredith Rd but did not appear to approach any houses though the area had been pointed out; did not appear to stop and enquire at any home to locate the source of the gunfire, to verify if there were shooters, licenced or otherwise, using high powered shotguns, licenced or otherwise, on a property in the area.

This was Easter. It was not a rifle range, there were no feral animals involved, it was apparently 'recreational shooting' in a semi rural residential area.

On the whole we have lovely neighbours.

Over Easter many of us were visited by families young and old. There are residents within this catchment who have suffered cancer, stroke, post traumatic stress from military service.

There are oldies and school age children, some with serious health problems.

Several became very upset when all of this peace was destroyed by a constant barrage of gunfire over Easter, up to six hours each day.

Hosts and visitors annoyed, some even nervous and fearful. That is the world we live in.

This was not right, thoughtful or respectful. I trust the residents involved don't invite their loaded friends again.

G. Penrose

Veteran

What mates do

IT HAS been more than a century since the Anzac legend was forged on battlefields across Europe.

Amid the horrors that played out in theatres of war in locations which are now infamous, an enduring legacy was built around the spirit of mateship.

This very concept of loyalty and sacrifice would go on to define our national character. These same threads exist today and form the fabric of our society.

Whether it be the First or Second World War, or more recent deployments to the Middle East or Afghanistan, one doesn't have to look too hard to see this commitment of looking out for each other.

The Salvation Army shares this same spirit of mateship today as we did serving our troops in the Boer War around the turn of the 20th Century.

Whether it be a hot drink and a snack to sustain weary minds and bodies, or a listening ear and words of strength and encouragement for those most in need, the Salvos were there.

(On Anzac Day), whether in barracks or in the field on exercises, or serving on overseas deployments, The Salvos are still there...and always will be.

Because that's what mates do.

Major Brett Gallagher,

The Salvation Army's Chief Commissioner for Red Shield Defence Services