Dumped shopping trolleys can often by spotted around Gympie. AAP IMAGE / Troy Snook)
Dumped shopping trolleys can often by spotted around Gympie. AAP IMAGE / Troy Snook)

Councils should crack down on abandoned shopping trolleys

Letter to the Editor

THE deficit of decency in major corporations speaks volumes, when it comes to finer details of running the company.

Major supermarkets, specifically the infamous duopoly, allow their very expensive trolleys to invade our suburbs and regions, as if they are dispensable. Who benefits from the oversight or negligence?

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These steel monstrosities are found abandoned in every suburb, in every town, much to residents’ disgust.

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Society tolerates the lack of accountability and action by supermarkets which have lost count, passing on losses to consumers.

It’s easier than chasing recalcitrant trolleys.

However, one “lone ranger” in supermarket history actually takes the trolley by the handle; expecting shoppers to pop in a $2 coin, reimbursed after their shop. It’s a win-win, brilliant strategy, keeping overheads down.

Rubbish, including a shopping trolley. Picture: Jim O'Rourke
Rubbish, including a shopping trolley. Picture: Jim O'Rourke

This tactic is rejected by the duopoly, persisting in factoring in thousands of trolley losses to consumers, despite environmental issues with abandonment, for convenience sake.

It displays poor role-modelling, failing to teach the lazy and the morally-deficit the environmental hazard it is. Rather than hitting shoppers in the hip pocket, councils need to toughen laws regarding recalcitrant shops and trolleys, fining supermarkets, or demanding they retrieve their branded trolleys at their own expense.

It is unconscionable that supermarkets know the cost to both consumers and the environment, decades after trolleys were introduced, but will not follow the Aldi example. With outlawing plastic-bags a success, it is time local governments were serious about the abandoned trolley syndrome. Hit their profit margins, so shareholders take action.

E. Rowe, Marcoola