UNDER PRESSURE: Deputy Premier Jackie Trad and Minister for Transport and Main Roads Mark Bailey. The State Government has been pressed to fund key Coast projects in next week's State Budget.
UNDER PRESSURE: Deputy Premier Jackie Trad and Minister for Transport and Main Roads Mark Bailey. The State Government has been pressed to fund key Coast projects in next week's State Budget. John McCutcheon

Enough of the games: MPs urge State to cough up cash

STATE and Federal LNP members have turned the blowtorch on what they claim is continued ignorance of the region by the State Government.

Fairfax MP Ted O'Brien called on the Palaszczuk government to come clean with its funding intentions for the region, ahead of Tuesday's State Budget.

"Enough of the games, if the Palaszczuk Government has no intention of funding projects on the Sunshine Coast, I'd prefer they just come clean and tell us," he said.

"Sunshine Coast residents have had a gut full of State Labor's hollow promises and their practice of talking up plans to build infrastructure, then kicking the can down the road.

"Sunshine Coasters have a right to expect local projects not just listed in the budget but also funded."

Data from Infrastructure New South Wales, modelled using publicly-available budget papers and prepared prior to this year's Federal Budget showed Queensland's state infrastructure spending had been dwarfed by its southern neighbours.

In the 2018-19 financial year the New South Wales state infrastructure spend of $24.471 billion far outstripped Queensland's expenditure of $5.927 billion.

Forward estimates showed the trend was set to continue, with Queensland set to spend only $7.081 billion in 2021-22 compared to $19.147 billion in New South Wales.

Mr O'Brien and Glass House MP and state Shadow Infrastructure Minister Andrew Powell dismissed the notion the Federal Government wasn't doing enough to help Queensland.

"The Federal Government is doing the heavy lifting," Mr Powell said.

In 2018-19 federal funding made up 26.63 per cent of Queensland's infrastructure spend, compared to just 8.1 per cent of New South Wales'.

That percentage was set to climb in Queensland to 27.11 per cent by 2021-22, significantly higher than the 4.17 per cent of New South Wales' state infrastructure spending.

Maroochydore MP Fiona Simpson said the Coast needed a "fairer share" of the state infrastructure spending pie, as the state's infrastructure investment dwindled.

Mr O'Brien said the Federal Government was investing 26 per cent of its total infrastructure spending (nearly $9.7 billion) in Queensland over the next four years.

He called on the State Government to match the Federal Government's 50-50 North Coast Rail Line duplication funding commitment.

To date the State Government had committed $160 million towards the project, but there remained a $230 million shortfall.

Both Bill Shorten and Federal Labor Leader Anthony Albanese had committed to matching the Federal Government's 50-50 commitment.

Mr O'Brien also called for $23 million to be included in the State Budget to bridge the gap needed to start a $301 million upgrade of the Bruce Highway at the Maroochydore Rd and Mons Rd interchanges.

"Despite having guaranteed 80 per cent of funding from the Federal Government, we continue to wait for the State to come to the party," he said.

A State Government spokesman said the details of the State Budget "will be released next week".

"The ABS has indicated the Queensland Government's infrastructure investment is contributing to Queensland having the strongest domestic economic growth in mainland Australia," the spokesman said.

Queensland Treasurer Jackie Trad committed to keep investing in the state during her budget speech this week, as she highlighted the state's low unemployment and booming exports.