"Green shirts” have become the enemies of the environment, this letter writer claims. WWF/Earth Hour

Green shirts the enemies of the environment: letter

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Enemies of the environment

THERE was a time when true environmentalists strove to protect wild things. Now the green shirts have become enemies of the environment by pushing green energy and demonising the building blocks of life - carbon and carbon dioxide.

Wind turbines and their cobweb of connecting roads and transmission lines have destroyed native trees and grasses, scarred and uglified wild hilltops, and littered continental shelves with naval and aerial obstacles. They create wind and rain shadows and decimate resident and migratory birds and bats.

Solar, generic.
Letter writer says industrial-scale solar steals sunlight from every plant that tries to live in the shadow of the panels and solar-thermal arrays roast birds, bats and insects. gyn9038

Industrial-scale solar is no better, stealing sunlight from every plant that tries to live in the shadow of the panels. Solar-thermal arrays have the additional trick of roasting any birds, bats and insects which fly through their focussed rays of heat.

These green energy toys produce piddling amounts of unreliable weather-dependent energy at great economic and environmental cost.

Greens also promoted diesel to replace cleaner petrol in vehicles. Thank them for more urban pollution.

Solar Panels
Industrial-scale solar steals sunlight from every plant that tries to live in the shadow of the panels, says letter writer.

Their promotion of ethanol and bio-diesel has caused the widespread conversion of crop land and clearing of natural vegetation and forests to grow industrial crops like corn and palm oil. This has also reduced food supplies, increased food prices and forced some poor people to poach in parklands.

And the stupid promotion of burning wood for power and home heating has taken some cities back 65 years to the era of London smogs. Forests are again being cleared and wood smoke is again choking urban communities.

None of these expensive and destructive activities will have any measurable or beneficial effect on global temperature.

What is the real agenda?

Viv Forbes,

Rosevale.

MORE LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Drugs endemic in society

BEN Cousins, former AFL star, is in the news for all the wrong reasons, yet again.

At 38 he has wasted his life and talent on drink, drugs and violence.

What he had was fame and talent, the envy of every up-and-coming sports fan, who idolised this star and the game.

A quantity of the drug ice was found during the operation.Photo Kelly Butterworth / CQ News
Are authorities losing the battle against drugs? Kelly Butterworth

How many fall into the same trap?

Violence in sports is played out in their personal lives and homes.

They are, for a while, a protected species, due to their popularity and talent.

The higher they rise the harder they fall.

Now, after falling from grace so many times, he has to face the music of a life wasted, bringing the game into disrepute, losing everything for the sake of his addictions which have taken priority over family, friends and fans.

The media attention is now on his bad behaviour and law-breaking antics.

Instead of giving him another chance, it is time courts make him pay for breaking a court-imposed VRO.

Stars or no stars, if they are law-breakers they should not be treated any different from any other member of the public. He is past tense as far as the sport is concerned. Let him reap the suffering he has sown on his own family.

Ice continues to break down our society one star at a time.

Falling from grace seems to be associated with too much success too soon, when the immature aren't ready for the fame and fortune it brings.

Authorities are losing the battle and such talent to an endemic culture of drugs.

E. Rowe,

Marcoola.