CAMPING OUT AT GAMES: Maryborough based Polleys driver Deborah Parry snatches some shut-eye between assignments.
CAMPING OUT AT GAMES: Maryborough based Polleys driver Deborah Parry snatches some shut-eye between assignments. Contributed

Gympie firm keeps Games spectators on the move

GYMPIE transport company, Polleys Coaches, is an integral part of the system which is keeping the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games on the rails and on the road.

"We've got 13 buses and 20 drivers down there,” Polleys boss Warren Polley said yesterday.

"Five are sitting at railways stations. They call it rail insurance,” he said.

Trevor Howard and Laurie Guse wait for a train as they back up rail services to the Commonwealth Games.
Trevor Howard and Laurie Guse wait for a train as they back up rail services to the Commonwealth Games. Contributed

They are among 250 buses sitting along the rail corridor to carry any extra people and to help in the event of any problems, Mr Polley said.

"They even have buses in Brisbane, so if you get off the public transport in Roma St and there are no local buses going to your home, say at Ferny Grove, there will be one there just to take you home.

"It's a really good gesture by (State Government transport co-ordination authority) Translink,” he said.

"We've got eight buses and another 15 drivers down there, based at Coomera.

"I can't give you exact figures, but there are about 1000 buses from all over Australia based there, just to carry people around.

"Our buses and drivers are a small part of a very large machine, all built to carry people around.

The 12 Drivers working to transport spectators and Games volunteers around the Gold Coast for the 13 days of the games.
THE TEAM: The 12 drivers working to transport spectators and Games volunteers around the Gold Coast for the 13 days of the games. Contributed

"I know they had a hiccup on the first day, but this was something that had never happened before and the planning was all based on computer models.

"Then 5000 people turned up, many of them early, thinking they would get an early start on the day.

"And there were only 12 buses and thousands of people.

"I would have had a lot more buses working down there, but most of our buses are fitted out for school transport and are not always suitable for transporting adults.”

Mr Polley said he felt great sympathy for his drivers, who are working practically without a break.

"My poor bus drivers. They just worked 10 weeks straight as school bus drivers and they've had three days off in that time.

"They will come back after the games and on Monday and school starts the Tuesday after that. As far as I've heard, the drivers are coping. They're loving it, meeting all the new people,” he said.