Part of the restored stretch of Commissioner's Gully showing the growth that has taken place and is now at the stage of needing thinning out.
Part of the restored stretch of Commissioner's Gully showing the growth that has taken place and is now at the stage of needing thinning out. Craig Warhurst

Restoration work on gully

COMMISSIONERS Gully runs from the Horseshoe Bend ridge down to the Mary behind the Active Riders area behind the Queens Park tennis courts in Gympie.

Revegetation work on stretches of the gully were the first public lands work carried out by Gympie Landcare.

Before restoration work started in 1996 the gully was seriously weed infested with a steep track up to Myall St and a large and increasing erosion problem due to large volumes of urban area runoff.

This problem was dealt with by drainage works and dispersing run-off.Restoraton

Some restoration work had been done by adjacent landholders, with seven residences taking part in the area up to Louisa St.

This early work was partly funded through grants from the Mary River Catchment Co-ordinating Committee riverbank restoration program.

The first time Landcare used Green Corps workers and they built the walking track, planted and mulched trees and installed a picnic table.

This core area was added to over the years with walking tracks, stairs and improved drainage on the hospital section.

This work was done by a diverse range of community groups including the Filipino-Australia Association, Gympie Permaculture, conservation volunteers and Work for the Dole participants.

Trees that were planted in the early stages grew well and were up to the stage of requiring thinning, but this was postponed due to the extended drought.

It is thought that this can now be done.

There is potential for the site to be extended past the karate club and beyond.

Other Gympie Landcare sites along the gully include near the karate club, the stretch through the Active Riders and from Brewery Rd to the river.

Gullys such as this play a vital role not only for aesthetic reasons but also as important wildlife corridors and for filtering urban water run off.

Most of the restoration work has been done by volunteers.

The work was initiated by Paul Marshall and is a highly valued part of the Gympie community assets.