(From left) Michelle Agnew, Karyn Smith, Tracey McKean, Rowena Robertson, Frances Klein, Ruth Donachie, Prue Marshall and Renee King celebrate the PANPA Advertising Awards success.
(From left) Michelle Agnew, Karyn Smith, Tracey McKean, Rowena Robertson, Frances Klein, Ruth Donachie, Prue Marshall and Renee King celebrate the PANPA Advertising Awards success. Tanya Easterby

Gympie Times scores award

GYMPIE'S rich and unique history has been the inspiration behind The Gympie Times' recent success at the PANPA Advertising Awards in Sydney.

The Gympie Times was successful in winning Best Feature Award for its Back in Time Feature, released earlier this year.

An interesting journey back in time, the feature celebrates Gympie's milestones and growth on the way to becoming the modern city it is today.

Gympie Times advertising manager Tracey McKean thanked everyone involved.

"I am very proud of the whole Gympie Times team who put in many hours to produce this pictorial publication to celebrate our 145th birthday," she said.

"This special edition is a fantastic look at our region since 1968 and it will become an important part of Gympie's print history.

"We would also like to thank local businesses who promoted their products and services inside this edition, without their support this pictorial would not have been possible."

Piecing the feature together was a lengthy and time-intensive process but a labour of love for Gympie Times staff Rowena Robertson and Frances Klein.

The pair sorted through old archives of The Gympie Times and Gympie Library records to reflect back on Gympie's formative years.

"It was hard to condense all this wonderful history into a feature," Ms Robertson said.

"Being selective was the most difficult part."

Compiling the feature allowed the pair to revisit many of Gympie's big moments in history.

"Gympie's history is fascinating," Ms Robertson said.

"It's easy to get lost in the pages of history. Once I started reading a bit, I wanted to keep reading more."

Mrs Klein said the history was a combination of humour, sadness and the askew.

"There was a unique way of writing back then and recording the town's events," she said.

The pair agreed, however, as much as things change, certain things remain the same.

"Many of the issues talked about back then we still talk about," Ms Robertson said.

Issues such as council, roads, services and election still dominate the public domain.