The man accused of masterminding the assassination of bikie boss Mick Hawi wants to be released from prison so he can manage his newly diagnosed diabetes.
The man accused of masterminding the assassination of bikie boss Mick Hawi wants to be released from prison so he can manage his newly diagnosed diabetes.

Alleged bikie hitman wants bail after diabetic coma

The man charged with planning the assassination of bikie boss Mahmoud "Mick" Hawi should be released on bail because he fell into a coma and nearly died before doctors diagnosed his diabetes, his lawyers say.

Ahmad "Adam" Doudar lost a significant amount of weight behind bars in Cessnock prison and told doctors he had a dry mouth, constant thirst and was urinating frequently, the NSW Supreme Court heard on Thursday.

But Doudar wasn't diagnosed with type 1 diabetes until he was taken to hospital and fell into a coma.

Police arrest Ahmad ‘Adam’ Doudar. Picture: Jenny Evans
Police arrest Ahmad ‘Adam’ Doudar. Picture: Jenny Evans

Medical experts spent Thursday theorising how best to treat his new condition after he nearly succumbed to the potentially fatal case of "diabetic ketoacidosis" earlier this year.

Doudar has been in custody awaiting trial of the shooting murder of Hawi outside a Rockdale gym in February 2018.

He has pleaded not guilty to the murder.

The Lone Wolf bikie looked thin and tired, wearing prison greens and watching via audiovisual link as his lawyers argued his second multimillion-dollar bid for bail.

Doudar had applied for release in April last year and had associates offer $2 million in surety.

But his release was refused because the judge was unimpressed by his "flagrant disregard" for law and order.

Doudar upped the ante on Thursday with three lots of real estate - valued at $1 million, $250,000 and $2 million - all offered up by his associates.

Mahmoud ‘Mick’ Hawi at court in 2014.
Mahmoud ‘Mick’ Hawi at court in 2014.

Barrister Grant Brady SC told the court Doudar's "anxiety levels" about his new condition were compounded by the COVID-19 pandemic because he was more susceptible to infection.

"This is a man who is fighting to comprehend what is happening to him and … doing so in exceptionally difficult circumstances," Mr Brady said.

"The onerous conditions this man is suffering are, again, exacerbated by this pandemic."

Mr Brady called the diagnosis a "life-changing moment" that eliminated Doudar's risk of fleeing the country if released.

His lawyers also argued the case against him was circumstantial and there was a considerable risk the trial, set down for July this year, would be pushed back because of the coronavirus.

Police examine the scene of the 2018 shooting. Picture: Toby Zerna
Police examine the scene of the 2018 shooting. Picture: Toby Zerna

Mr Brady said the prospects of Doudar being acquitted were very real.

Crown prosecutors argued that, with all prison visits halted due to the pandemic, custody was likely the safest place for Doudar.

"I don't know if you'll get much social distancing (in prison), Justice Robert Hulme quipped.

The prosecutor agreed it was "not ideal" but likened sharing a cell to a couple sharing a studio apartment.

The court will decide on Doudar's bail release on Tuesday.

Originally published as Hawi's alleged killer wants bail for diabetes