IN THE POCKET: Chris de Vere says he has seen a Mary River crocodile, at Fisherman's Pocket, and heard of others further upstream
IN THE POCKET: Chris de Vere says he has seen a Mary River crocodile, at Fisherman's Pocket, and heard of others further upstream

Heritage Mary River crossing our first reported croc site

MARY River crocodile sightings are now officially a part of our heritage, after council recognition of the heritage significance of a Tiaro location, which is also the setting for our first reported upstream Mary River croc sighting.

Glengarloom Crossing, virtually in the middle of Tiaro, has been recognised for its long history as a transport corridor, but is also where a saltwater crocodile was reportedly shot in 1898.

These days re is not much left of Glengarloom Crossing, but who would not be looking a bit tired after being run over by a truck.

And Glengarloom Crossing has been run over, not just once and not just by a truck, but by carts and cars and horses as well over its career as a major transport route between Maryborough and the Gympie gold fields, from the 1870s to the 1930s.

Fraser Coast Regional Council backed heritage listing for the crossing last year, 84 years after it was done out of a job by the construction of the current Tiaro bridge in 1932.

It is also the scene for Tiaro's first recorded crocodile sighting.

A large crocodile was shot near Tiaro in the 1960s and some Gympie residents say they have seen them a lot further south than that, even up to Fisherman's Pocket, just outside Gympie.

The Courier-Mail reported on December 23, 1936 on a crocodile sighting near Tiaro the previous Tuesday.

The same report then mentions the Glengarloom Crossing sighting, one confirmed by the fact that the creature was shot.

"Two persons report having seen a small crocodile in the Mary River," the report says, adding: "Thirty-eight years ago a crocodile was shot at Glengarloom Crossing.