Oliver Graham Watts duped gambling giant by exploiting promo offers, 17 mobile phones and and multiple Ubet accounts.
Oliver Graham Watts duped gambling giant by exploiting promo offers, 17 mobile phones and and multiple Ubet accounts.

How man tried to dupe betting giant

A MAN has been stung for "duping" $7500 out of a gambling giant by exploiting promotional offers.

Oliver Graham Watts used 17 mobile phones to create multiple Ubet accounts to take advantage of the agency's cash-back offer. Money was returned if the horse he backed to win ran a place.

Under the terms and conditions of the deal, a person is allowed only one account.

When confronted by police, Watts did not believe he had committed a crime.

The Victorian man was picked up by police in Surfers Paradise on October 19, 2018 after Ubet noticed suspicious activity on their betting apps.

The Southport Magistrates Court was told today that Watts was found with about $90,000 in credit vouchers but only $7500 had been gained through the cash-back scheme.

He pleaded guilty to dealing with credit vouchers that were reasonably suspected to be property that was proceeds of crime.

Oliver Graham Watts (right) leaves Southport Court with his lawyer Joshua Boorman. Picture: Lea Emery
Oliver Graham Watts (right) leaves Southport Court with his lawyer Joshua Boorman. Picture: Lea Emery

Magistrate Kay Philipson sentenced the 23-year-old to a 12-month, $1000 good behaviour bond and six months probation.

No conviction was recorded.

"You were trying to dupe the system which was put in place by a large betting organisation," she said.

"Whilst you had some success in what you were doing, it would seem you made fairly limited profit of some $2500."

Magistrate Philipson described the offending as "sophisticated" but also "naive".

She said she accepted that Watts did not know it was against the law and no other people have been charged with similar offending.

"It does put your criminality in my view to the level of being unusual."

Watts's barrister Phillip Boulten, instructed by Boorman Lawyers, said Watts was unaware what he was doing was illegal.

"He was betting in public places, hotels and TABs and he was not hiding his identification as he was placing bets," he said.

Mr Boulten said Watts explained to police what he was doing.

"The clear implication is that he did not know what he was doing was a crime."

Mr Boulten said Watts had won a scholarship to study commerce, had started a business and was suffering from anxiety.

He said it was the first time Watts had come into contact with the criminal justice system.

Watts has complied with all his bail conditions.