REASON FOR CONCERN?: The Western Downs recorded the lowest rate rise compared to surrounding regions.
REASON FOR CONCERN?: The Western Downs recorded the lowest rate rise compared to surrounding regions. Barry Leddicoat

How your rate rise compares around the region

THEY'RE calling it the lowest rate rise in Queensland but the 1.25percent rate increase for the Western Downs has been met with mixed reviews.

Matthew Curtis, 48, has lived in Dalby for 16 years and has owned a home for five years.

As a long-term resident of the Western Downs, Mr Curtis has witnessed his fair share of rate fluctuations.

"I wasn't expecting another rate increase so close after the last one," he said.

"That means I've got to readjust my budget to pay more money to make sure I can cover the rates still.

"At the end of the day, they've still got to make money to cover services and roads and stuff like that as well.

"It's a bit of a hard one."

As a homeowner, MrCurtis is concerned about affordability with news of another rate increase.

"It'll certainly make the budget a little tighter around the home," he said.

"Any rate rise makes it harder."

In the delivery of their 2019-20 Budget, Western Downs Regional Council spruiked the benefits of a fractional rate rise, comparative to the 1.5 per cent rise delivered in last year's budget.

Within surrounding regions the rate rise in the Western Downs has been the lowest recorded.

Toowoomba Regional Council's announcement of a 2.5 per cent increase for residents was met with immediate criticism from residents.

The South Burnett recorded a 1.9 per cent rise.

Mr Curtis said while our rates were comparatively lower, the rise was still not the outcome he wanted.

"The increase is one thing but looking how much rates they actually pay for their land is the big difference," he said.

"They say 'ours is not as much as anybody else's' but if we compare how much we pay per acre of land in Dalby compared to other places in Toowoomba, are they compatible that way?"