A well-known Australian jewellery designer has revealed why she called her body some 'vile, bitchy' things over the years.
A well-known Australian jewellery designer has revealed why she called her body some 'vile, bitchy' things over the years.

Insta star’s raw conversation with her body

A WELL-known Australian jewellery designer has revealed how she has called her body some "vile, bitchy" things over the years in a raw post to her 224,000 followers on Instagram.

In a candid letter that has resonated with people around the world, Samantha Wills reveals how she struggled for years with extreme pain and ignored what her body was trying to tell her because she was so busy with her life and multimillion-dollar business.

The 38-year-old Sydney woman, who underwent surgery for stage-four endometriosis in January after finally going to the doctor in late 2019, wrote how she was left astounded by the resilience of the human body, which she refers to as "she" or "her" in her post.

"The bounce-back from the sometimes-bullshit treatment I have offered her over the years, or the many (many) occasions I would just TOTALLY ignore what She was trying to tell me all together, too busy with things that I deemed to be much more important at any given time (sic)," Wills wrote on her Instagram account.

Samantha Wills, 38, following her operation for stage four endometriosis. She said if anyone needed a sign it was time to see a GP, this was their sign. Picture: Samanthawills/Instagram
Samantha Wills, 38, following her operation for stage four endometriosis. She said if anyone needed a sign it was time to see a GP, this was their sign. Picture: Samanthawills/Instagram

"The work ethic of just how she instantly gets to work mending, repairing and healing after trauma and surgery. If She was an employee I'd give her praise and a raise.

"I've also said and thought some REALLY nasty, vile, bitchy things about her over the years, she heard them all. Things SO awful that if I ever used the same words to describe another's body, it would be a valid certainty that absolutely no-body would talk to me ever again."

Wills, who posted a photo of herself in a bikini showing the recent surgery scars, said she would be using them as reminders to be kinder to her body and to prioritise her health.

"I'm going to use each of these marks as daily reminders to be better to her," she wrote.

"To not only LISTEN to what my body is telling me, but also to be a lot more thankful that she still talks to me at all."

The entrepreneur started her jewellery empire in her kitchen in her hometown of Port Macquarie when she was 22 and closed what became a multi-million jewellery company in January 2019.

Samantha Wills, 38. Picture: Samanthawills/Instagram
Samantha Wills, 38. Picture: Samanthawills/Instagram

She has posted openly throughout her social media account and on her website, samanthawills.com, about how two large fibroids the "size of an orange" were detected late last year, following a doctor's appointment that Wills said she initially only booked to discuss the process of freezing her eggs.

A GP noted the "abnormalities" in Wills' menstrual cycle and referred her to a specialist for tests, which she put off until after a work trip to New York City."

Next to a photograph of herself in a hospital bed, Wills wrote that the surgery was not pleasant, but neither was the pain she had been experiencing for the past five years.

"But for the longest time, instead of going to see a specialist about it, I labelled it a hindrance," she wrote on Instagram.

"Yep, a hindrance. Often I even got ANGRY at my body that the pain was most often a massive inconvenience to me (sic)."

Samantha Wills in hospital. Picture: Samanthawills/Instagram
Samantha Wills in hospital. Picture: Samanthawills/Instagram

Wills told the The Courier-Mail she wrote and shared her story in the hope that it might help someone.

"I believe storytelling is important, especially on issues that are not being spoken about," she said.

"So I wrote and shared this in the hope that even if one person reads it and takes inspired action on what their body is trying to tell them, then that's worthy of telling the story."

Wills, who also runs the Samantha Wills Foundation, said she had been overwhelmed with hundreds of women reaching out.

"And not only sharing their story, but also telling me that in sharing mine they now didn't feel so alone, and best of all, have been the countless notes from people (both women and men) who have taken inspired action and booked in to see a GP or specialists on an issue their body has been nagging them about, but they have been putting it off," she said.