USQ Journalism students (from left) Keeley Miller, Anna Guerarra-Adams, Kimberley Hanson-Ross and Riley Condrick have been learning from the history of the Queensland Times as part of their studies.
USQ Journalism students (from left) Keeley Miller, Anna Guerarra-Adams, Kimberley Hanson-Ross and Riley Condrick have been learning from the history of the Queensland Times as part of their studies.

Journos of the future take a look back in time

THE FOREVER changing news media landscape means tertiary educators are being kept on their toes when it comes to guiding the next generation of reporters.

At USQ, however, journalism lecturer Caryn Coatney is finding her students are benefiting from looking back into history to understand the world we live in today.

Among other publications that have stood the test of time, Dr Coatney is using the 160-year history of the Queensland Times as an example of the changing face of the profession.

USQ's History of Journalism lessons have been recognised as the nation's only course of its kind during the Journalism Education and Research Association of Australia conference.

Dr Coatney said she found the QT was an ideal model for aspiring journalists.

Among those students is 21-year-old Riley Condrick, an aspiring political and video gaming reporter who is in his final year of study.

Mr Condrick completed the History of Journalism unit last year and said it was important to learn from history as much as it was to prepare for the future.

"I think the profession of journalism is fine and it is just a case where the medium is shifting to better suit the audience," he said.

 

USQ Journalism students (from left) Keeley Miller, Anna Guerarra-Adams, Kimberley Hanson-Ross and Riley Condrick have been learning from the history of the Queensland Times as part of their studies.
USQ Journalism students (from left) Keeley Miller, Anna Guerarra-Adams, Kimberley Hanson-Ross and Riley Condrick have been learning from the history of the Queensland Times as part of their studies.

 

"It always good to better understand the history of journalism and look at how it has had to evolve over time."

The QT has just endured one of its most challenging periods in the past 12 months, adapting to an all-digital format following the difficult decision to shut down the print edition at the end of June last year.

Dr Coatney said it was an important real-world example for students to learn from.

"We have always looked at the QT because of its long success and how established it has become in the community," she said.

"The QT has been a leader in bringing the community together in the wake of natural disasters."

The USQ course was named as unique in Australia in a research study by The University of Sydney media and communications lecturer, Dr Margaret Van Heekeren, and publishing and communications lecturer, Dr Sybil Nolan.

Second-year student Anna Guerarra-Adams is one of those students looking forward to taking on the subject this year.

"I want to get into television or radio but I believe it is important to learn about the history of journalism and how it got to where it is today," she said.

While learning from the past, USQ students have never stopped looking forward.

The uni also offers a Graduate Certificate in Professional Communication which delves specifically in the role of digital in today's news.

A panel of industry experts will speak at the Springfield campus from 1pm Tuesday on the future opportunities available and communication skills that are essential to thrive in the robotics revolution.