Students Jack Stoneman, Madylin Rachow, Lincoln Schroder, Nyssa Exharos, Thorun Souter and Eli Byrne are excited about the new garden.
Students Jack Stoneman, Madylin Rachow, Lincoln Schroder, Nyssa Exharos, Thorun Souter and Eli Byrne are excited about the new garden. Craig Warhurst

Kids get healthy habits

TWO Mile State School has received nearly $60,000 to build a kitchen garden.

The school applied for the grant under the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden program and was successful.

"It was an extensive process," principal Karen Warren said.

She said the Cancer Council had given a further $3000 for shade to protect the students while working in the garden.

"The idea is for the kids to experience the process of growing their own food and cooking it in the kitchen, which will also have a dining area so they can learn to share food," she said.

The money will transform the original principal's residence, built when the school opened in 1883, which has been used as a library more recently.

Two Mile will now fund a kitchen and a garden specialist.

"It will teach healthy eating patterns and engage children at an early age about healthy eating and exploring tastes."

Ms Warren said the school's years 4 and 5 would start the program this year and later it would be expanded to years 6 and 3, but "every class will be involved in the gardening".

Younger students have been busy painting decorations; everyone is excited.

The first working bee for the project was washed out, but another is being held tomorrow at 8.30am so bring your tools.

Also tomorrow at 11am a community meeting will be held, anyone is welcome to come.

The program

The Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden aims to change the way children approach and think about food.

As participants, eight to 12-year-old children spend time in a productive veggie garden and home-style kitchen each week, learning skills that will last them a lifetime, and discovering how much fun it is to grow and cook their own seasonal vegetables and fruits.