PICTURE PERFECT: Lake Poona is Ron Turner’s nomination as a heritage wonder in the geography/natural world section of the National Trust’s publication to celebrate Gympie 150 in 2017.
PICTURE PERFECT: Lake Poona is Ron Turner’s nomination as a heritage wonder in the geography/natural world section of the National Trust’s publication to celebrate Gympie 150 in 2017. Contributed

Lake Poona nominated as ‘wonder’ for Gympie 150

PICTURE-PERFECT Lake Poona is Ron Turner's nomination as a heritage wonder in the geography/natural world section of the National Trust's publication to celebrate Gympie 150 in 2017.

The public is invited to help compile lists of the region's most significant heritage sites which will be included in a special, quality publication to help celebrate the region's sesquicentenary.

In 1978, Mr Turner came to Gympie as district ranger to look after the Cooloola National Park, and he is currently writing his memoirs of the park's difficult early years.

Although he retired in 1995, his attachment to the Cooloola area is undimmed, and he continues to research its wonders.

"Lake Poona is a perched lake in the Cooloola section of Great Sandy National Park," Mr Turner said.

"Visitors can walk there from the car park at the Bymien picnic area.

"The lake, 'perched' in a basin in the high dunes, is surrounded by mixed eucalypt and rain forest, edged with a delightful carrol scrub.

"Hikers travel past bizarre strangler figs, primitive macrozamias, and towering kauri and hoop pines, remnants of the early logging era.

"Poona is an Aboriginal word for the bloodwood tree, and the name appears on a map made by William Pettigrew after he entered the area looking for timber in 1862.

"At first, timber-getters hauled logs from the forest to a rafting ground at Seary's Creek.

"Lake Poona is the largest lake of its kind in Cooloola and as such it deserves special attention.

"It's a place of tranquillity and beauty that requires a small amount of personal effort to reach.

"To keep the lake a modest distance from the nearest road, we upgraded a walking track from the days of Forestry management."