A man who used a website to analyse photos of a woman he matched with on a dating app to check if she was pretty enough to go out with didn't like it when she returned the favour.

London publishing assistant Katie Coe took screenshots of a message thread she shared with the man after matching with him on Hinge - the dating app "designed to be deleted" when you find someone to spend the rest of your life with.

This bloke didn't even make it to the first date after relying on a computer to tell him whether she was good enough for him, and then - for some bizarre reason - told her that.


"Freddie" relied on a website called Pretty Scale, where you can upload a photo of someone so an algorithm can rate their attractiveness.

There are several flaws with doing this, the most obvious being that beauty standards differ from person to person.

There's also issues stemming with how the algorithm was trained, and these machine codes that increasingly run our lives are notorious for getting things wrong due to what they've been taught (probably the most relatable computers can get).

The
The "Pretty Scale" website asks all the questions Kasey Chambers already did.

In Freddie's case, whichever picture he decided to upload of Ms Coe, he was seemingly impressed enough with the answer, though did note her "forehead is too big".

It didn't secure him a date though.

The man's bizarre need for a computer did not endear him. Picture: Twitter/Katie Coe
The man's bizarre need for a computer did not endear him. Picture: Twitter/Katie Coe


Some respondents to Ms Coe's Twitter post have speculated he may have been attempting to "neg" her - a form of emotional manipulation introduced by pick-up artists in the early 2000s that only the smoothest of brains are still trying to use as a courting technique.

"Looks like a classic example of negging - paying you a backhanded compliment to undermine your confidence and increase your need for approval from him," one Twitter user explained.

"That's always the most transparent sh*t!" one frustrated woman wrote after presumably watching any piece of popular media from the past 15 years. "Do guys not realise that women know what that is?"

In response Ms Coe uploaded a screenshot of the poo emoji and delivered its "very ugly" rating.

He wasn't happy when she ran a test of her own. Picture: Twitter/Katie Coe
He wasn't happy when she ran a test of her own. Picture: Twitter/Katie Coe

"F**k you," the man whinged in reply. "I'm not ugly!" He added, presumably in reference to his looks and not his behaviour.

Ms Coe reported she had unmatched Freddie and deleted his number.

A 2018 article in The Sun quoted the Pretty Scale's founder explaining a bit about how his "stupid website" works.

"That data is based on average proportions of people considered beautiful in media. The data is different from males and females but not for different ethnicities.

"The algorithm to measure beauty has been changed so many times to fit all ethnicities but I cannot claim it fits for all ethnic backgrounds."

This means the algorithm will find attractive what it's been taught to find attractive (though you could argue the same is true for humans if you really wanted to: Let's not get into it here).

Anyway, let's get to the fun bit and do a little gonzo journalism.

The site does warn prospective users not to use it if you have "low self-esteem or confidence issues", but it would be irresponsible reporting for us to tell you about this website without testing it out for ourselves, so I decided to upload a photo anyway.

Our in-depth investigation has exposed several flaws in the website and its mean algorithm who I never actually had a crush on in the first place.

The website is obviously not very accurate.
The website is obviously not very accurate.

For someone with a "normal" mouth size I sure do enjoy never shutting up, possibly to distract from my monstrous chin and bad face symmetry.

The even smaller brain behind my small forehead did consider the algorithm struggled with the angle of this photo so I decided to try again, with a separate photo from this same shoot that was used to test the lighting.

As you can see this picture is objectively worse - I'm scowling like I do in all of my baby pictures - but according to Pretty Scale it makes me 23 per cent more attractive!

Amazing transformation: Gronk goes from ‘not bad’ to ‘pretty’ by taking an objectively worse photo.
Amazing transformation: Gronk goes from ‘not bad’ to ‘pretty’ by taking an objectively worse photo.

Pretty Scale does warn the results "could be incorrect".

It also promises any photos you upload are not saved or shared.

Originally published as Man's bizarre message to match