Medical funding runs out for shark attack victims

 

The two British victims of last week's Whitsunday shark attack face another hurdle in their holiday from hell.

Backpackers Alistair Raddon, 28, and Danny Maggs, 22, will no longer have free medical treatment as the Federal Government funds only immediate necessary care.

 

Shark attack victims Alistair Raddon and Danny Maggs
Shark attack victims Alistair Raddon and Danny Maggs

 

Both were seriously injured in a frenzied attack while snorkelling in the tourism hotspot. Alistair lost his right foot and could face further amputation. Danny was left with severe lacerations and nerve damage to his lower right leg. They still face multiple surgeries, physical and psychological therapy and prosthetics fittings.

A GoFundme account has been set up to help with the costs. They have raised more than $8000 in one day but their target is a staggering $250,000.

The young men, who met while travelling Australia, are now recovering in Mackay Base Hospital.

Shark attack victims Alistair Raddon and Danny Maggs in the Whitsundays before the attack
Shark attack victims Alistair Raddon and Danny Maggs in the Whitsundays before the attack

A spokesman for the Department of Health said that British citizens travelling to Australia on a British passport are entitled to limited subsidised health services from Medicare for immediate medically necessary treatment.

"While the circumstances for the British men are tragic, people travelling to Australia and Australians travelling to other countries that we have reciprocal health care agreements with are advised that reciprocal health care agreements do not cover all health care needs and appropriate travel insurance should be obtained," a spokesman said.

The men were taking part in a snorkelling boat tour when the shark hit. Thanks to Swedish nurses on the tour, who leapt into action, their lives were saved.