Gold Coasters and tourists lay wreaths and flower tributes to the four people who died on the Thunder River Rapids Ride. Picture: Lyndon Mechielsen/The Australian
Gold Coasters and tourists lay wreaths and flower tributes to the four people who died on the Thunder River Rapids Ride. Picture: Lyndon Mechielsen/The Australian

Mum's heartbreaking words on children's traumatic death

"WE exist in a world full of grief and shattered families and friends - three mothers who have lost their children, living with broken hearts and souls."

Those were the heartbreaking words of Kim Dorsett, who lost her daughter Kate Goodchild, her son Luke Dorsett and her son's partner Roozi Araghi in the horrific tragedy on the Thunder River Rapids Ride at Dreamworld on October 25, 2016.

New Zealand-born Cindy Low was also killed.

Ms Dorsett made a moving statement to the coronial inquest into the Dreamworld tragedy, revealing her struggles and a little of each of the three who had lost their lives.

"Let's not forget those four beautiful children who will now grow up without a mum and that's what this has really been about," she said.

Kim Dorsett, mother of Kate Goodchild and Luke Dorsett, following the release of the coronial findings. Picture: AAP
Kim Dorsett, mother of Kate Goodchild and Luke Dorsett, following the release of the coronial findings. Picture: AAP

Ms Dorsett told of an exceptionally close brother and sister who loved music and both worked in the public service in Canberra. When Mr Dorsett and Mr Araghi met, the duo became a trio.

"The three lived, laughed and loved together and where one was the others were not far away," Ms Dorsett said.

Dreamworld tragedy victims Roozi Araghi, Kate Goodchild, Luke Dorsett and Cindy Low. Picture: Supplied
Dreamworld tragedy victims Roozi Araghi, Kate Goodchild, Luke Dorsett and Cindy Low. Picture: Supplied

The trio, including Ms Dorsett, were on a trip to the Gold Coast to visit the theme parks.

"The three of them loved the theme parks on the Gold Coast, the scarier the ride the better," she said.

"They visited Dreamworld three times in a week when we were here."

The Araghi family has not attended any of the inquest hearings, deeming the process too emotionally taxing.

Ms Dorsett said she had spoken often with them, particularly following the incident.

"We concluded the easiest part of this time since the tragic accident was burying them - the horrendous legacy is living each day without them," she said.

Ms Dorsett remained composed for a majority of her moving speech, but there was one moment her voice cracked.

"My huge regret is the one day she needed me the most I wasn't there," she said.

The family now celebrate Christmas, birthdays and other special events at the cemetery, or "heaven", as young Evie describes it.

Evie was just eight months old at the time of the tragedy and was being looked after by her father David Turner while her sister and two uncles were on the rides.

Ms Dorsett said the family now told stories of the trio to help the young girl learn about and get to know her mother and uncles.

Cindy Low's nine-year-old daughter was also coming to terms with living without a mother.

Matthew Low, husband of Cindy Low, following the coronial recommendations yesterday. Picture: AAP
Matthew Low, husband of Cindy Low, following the coronial recommendations yesterday. Picture: AAP

Matt Low, husband of Cindy Low, read out a statement from the young girl.

"Mum was a very good person with a very big heart," she wrote. "She looked out for other people and would do anything for Keiran and I.

"I miss her hugs and her cakes that she used to make us all the time."

Mr Low said the family's "heart aches daily" as they tried to be grateful for the short time they had.

 

 

 

 

"She had the heart of a tiger, fierce and protective, soft and nurturing, stubborn and dogmatic, unpredictable and confident," he said.

"All of the best character traits rolled into a 5-foot tall package."

Mr Low and Ms Dorsett thanked the coroner and investigators for the time and respect they had shown.

Ms Low's brother Michael Cook gave a heart-wrenching account about how he was still in New Zealand when he found out the day after the disaster that his sister was involved in the tragedy.

He said he struggled to stay in the speed limit as he rushed to be at his mother's side.

"No one will forget the last few seconds of Cindy helping to get her son out of the raft," he said.

Mr Cook spoke of how since the incident he had turned to alcohol, had a relationship break-up and struggled every day.

Michael Cook, brother of Cindy Low, holds a picture of her as he leaves the Coronial Court in Brisbane yesterday. Picture: AAP
Michael Cook, brother of Cindy Low, holds a picture of her as he leaves the Coronial Court in Brisbane yesterday. Picture: AAP

"I lost my sister, my support team … she was there to make my life better," he said. Ms Low's mother Donna Cook provided a statement saying how much she missed her daughter.

"I could write you a thousand impact statements but I sill could not relate the grief and loss," she said.

 

 

 

 

Barrister Steven Whybrow read a statement from Shayne Goodchild, the father of Mr Dorsett and Ms Goodchild, who made calls for Dreamworld and Ardent Leisure to "strengthen their governance" and "value their staff and public more". "To say we love them is trite, we adore them," the statement said.

"To say we miss them every day does not begin to encompass that.

"There is not a moment when we don't wish they hadn't set foot on that ride," he said. "Such tragedies do not happen by accident, they do not happen out of nowhere."

Mr Goodchild and Mr Turner had previously been critical of the theme park and at the end the first week of the inquest released a statement saying they blamed Dreamworld.