Nick Kyrgios, doesn’t care what happens on the outside courts. Picture: AP Photo
Nick Kyrgios, doesn’t care what happens on the outside courts. Picture: AP Photo

Nick Kyrgios’ massive ego trip

NICK Kyrgios has given short shrift to players complaining of unfavourable treatment on the US Open's outside courts - including his Australian Davis Cup teammates Alex de Minaur and John Millman. 

De Minaur and Millman have both raised concerns over the hasty introduction of a shot clock at the final grand slam of the year, as well as expressing their dissatisfaction at players on TV courts being afforded more time at changeovers.

De Minaur said he was lucky he got to play on a TV court for his first-round win over Taro Daniel, which offered him an extra 30 seconds to ready himself for battle.

"And it really does make a huge difference," the teenager said.

"Last week I played on an outside court with no TV and I would sit down - it was hot and humid conditions - so I would want to change a shirt, drink, get my gels, this, that and I was feeling like they had already called time and I'm rushing.

"And that's not a way you want to feel on a tennis court. You want to feel like everything is under control and you're playing on your own time. So I feel like every match you play should be those TV times, especially in these hot and humid conditions.

"They can't have different times for different courts. I don't think that's fair."

Kyrgios, though, can't see what all the fuss about.

"At the end of the day, sport's entertainment so it doesn't really matter about these outside courts," the tennis showman said after delivering a typically colourful display for fans on the impressively upgraded Louis Armstrong Stadium.

Nick Kyrgios, of Australia, gestures during his first round match against Radu Albot. Picture: AP Photo
Nick Kyrgios, of Australia, gestures during his first round match against Radu Albot. Picture: AP Photo

Kyrgios didn't always have the crowd on his side during his 7-5 2-6 6-4 6-2 first-round win over Moldovan Radu Albot - but he still enjoyed the experience of the airy new arena.

"I like it a lot. I thought it was a great court actually. I really liked it," he said ahead of his second-round clash with Pierre-Hugues Herbert on Thursday. "The atmosphere feels good. I could hear every boo when they booed me. "You get that a lot, so it's very good that they're making these courts echo the boos. I like it a lot. It's a lot of fun.

"The US Open crowds are always fun to play in front of. It kind of felt like an indoor court, almost. It was pretty loud in there."

 

KYRGIOS SLAMS US OPEN OFFICIALS

Kyrgios may have enjoyed his interactions with the crowd but he was far from happy with US Open officials.

After a scorching day in which temperatures nudged towards 40C at Flushing Meadows, humidity levels were still extreme even when Kyrgios hit the court for the night session on Louis Armstrong Stadium.

"I'm f***ed, my legs are f***ed. I'm cooked, I'm f***ing done. I can't play," Kyrgios moaned to his courtside box during the second set.

But after recovering to safely advance to the second round, Kyrgios took aim at the United States Tennis Association (USTA).

On a day featuring six mid-match retirements in the men's event, tournament referee Brian Earley took the unprecedented step of offering players a 10-minute break after the third set.

The women have long played under an extreme heat rule offering 10 minutes' relief before the deciding third set.

"The heat can become dangerous at times," Kyrgios said.

"I don't think we had a heat rule. We made one up today, right? "That's just ridiculous. Honestly, I think we should have a heat rule. "It's not healthy for players to be out there and getting dizzy and stuff. We're the ones playing.

"It's not only players. The ball kids out there … and the spectators aren't going to watch if it's that hot."