OPINION: You say people don't like the flag and Australia Day? Where is your evidence? You say that people don't like democracy? What a thing to say.
OPINION: You say people don't like the flag and Australia Day? Where is your evidence? You say that people don't like democracy? What a thing to say.

Perrett's 'confected outrage' over Australia Day lacks facts

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

RESPONSE to Tony Perrett (The Gympie Times, January 22)

What confected outrage? Nobody is trying to deny anyone of their Australia Day.

For most, this day is an extremely welcome public holiday. For many a chance to spend time with family and friends.

I'm sure there are many who reflect on what it is to be Australian at this time. We see a range of practices on this national day. From fantastic citizenship ceremonies to celebrations, some elaborate, some simple.

Sadly, some use the day as an excuse to consume too much alcohol or use it as a vehicle to espouse outdated or even racist views.

Where are some facts Tony?

POWER 30 - Gympie MP Tony Perrett.
Gympie MP Tony Perrett. Philippe Coquerand

You say people don't like the flag and Australia Day?

Where is your evidence?

You say that people don't like democracy? What a thing to say.

Many people cherish democracy. Like it or not we live in a multicultural country which is home to many people of differing cultural backgrounds including the oldest living culture in the world.

Then you jump to talking about the undermining of traditions through education with your pearly words of wisdom.

Your only advice to students returning to school to learn was to watch out for the PC mob.

Really, Mr Perrett is that the best you could do?

I would like to see your evidence of the curriculum being "cluttered with ideological agendas masquerading under innocent titles of new government programs and policies" (The Gympie Times, January 22). I am familiar with the curriculum and unlike my school education, students today learn the reality of white settlement in Australia from both perspectives.

Students read both facts and opinions from a variety of sources.

Students are taught how to differentiate between fact and opinion during their English lessons.

The content helps them understand the harsh realities of our history.

Those who are not in denial are ready to move on. A great country worth celebrating on a national day embodies all its people wholeheartedly.

TRACEY MCWILLIAM,

GYMPIE

KEEP READING FOR ANOTHER LETTER ON AUSTRALIA DAY

THERE are many reasons why Australia Day is such an important and special occasion for communities across Queensland.

For new Australian citizens, it's a day they'll never forget.

Credit must go to the Queensland local governments who conduct citizenship ceremonies, after months of planning and preparation.

From Cape York to Coolangatta, mayors and councillors ensure these ceremonies are formal occasions that welcome our newest citizens.

Australia Day is also a time to recognise the men and women who go above and beyond to make their communities a better place.

The local award ceremonies recognised and encourage community involvement, cultural pursuits and sporting achievements.

Congratulations to those people who will be recognised for their efforts and contribution.

Australia Day is a community focused day, facilitated by the work of Queensland mayors, councillors and council staff - it is a day of respect for local community members and for those who wish to become part of our Queensland communities.

Ann Leahy,

Shadow Minister for Local Government