Parts of Queensland are on high alert for bushfires, with the arrival of scorching temperatures.
Parts of Queensland are on high alert for bushfires, with the arrival of scorching temperatures.

FIRE LIST: Queensland's hottest regions as fire danger soars

AUTHORITIES have warned the public to be on high alert, with potentially extreme fire dangers predicted today and tomorrow for areas already devastated by bushfires.

Queensland Fire and Emergency Services crews are preparing for serious conditions in Brisbane's west, where high temperatures and a lack of rain are putting ­communities on edge.

QFES state co-ordinator Wayne Waltisbuhl said the fire-ravaged community of Stanthorpe, as well as Toowoomba and Dalby and ­surrounding areas, should be on high alert.

"We've been sitting at a high fire danger now for a couple of months, and we get these spikes in the weather," Mr Waltisbuhl said.

We're going to see another spike (today) and Tuesday," he said.

He urged residents of fire-prone areas to be prepared to evacuate if conditions worsen.

"If ignition starts, we know it will be difficult to contain fires," Mr Waltisbuhl said.

"We've been ramping up since Thursday, Friday."

MAXIMUM HEAT

The scorching temperatures forecast across southern Queensland - today and Tuesday

Ipswich: 40C, 40C

Gayndah: 39C, 40C

Beaudesert: 38C, 39C

Kingaroy: 37C, 37C

Caboolture: 34C, 37C

Warwick: 37C, 36C

Brisbane: 34C, 36C

Stanthorpe: 34C, 32C

With two-thirds of Queensland declared in drought, Mr Waltisbuhl said regions would need more than 100mm of rainfall to simply ease the fire threat.

Temperatures are expected to soar into the mid-30s today and tomorrow in ­Brisbane. Ipswich can expect tops of 40C today and 41C ­tomorrow.

Parts of Queensland are on high alert for bushfires, with the arrival of scorching temperatures.
Parts of Queensland are on high alert for bushfires, with the arrival of scorching temperatures.

In the fire-ravaged Granite Belt, locals are preparing for very high or even extreme fire danger.

Apple grower Anthony ­Giacosa was one of many at Applethorpe who narrowly avoided total devastation when last month's historic bushfires ripped through the Granite Belt region.

The fire came within metres of his family home and singed the netting surrounding the apple orchard, almost costing them their livelihood.

Mr Giacosa said his family were preparing for the worst again with the grim forecast.

"We have done some repair work to the damaged net, (but we're) just desperate for rain," he said.

"(It's) really getting bad with the heat in the equation also now."

On the coast, temperatures will be less severe. Twelve-year-old Lleyton Pollard from Wurtulla, takes the plunge at Currimundi Lake. Picture: Lachie Millard
On the coast, temperatures will be less severe. Twelve-year-old Lleyton Pollard from Wurtulla, takes the plunge at Currimundi Lake. Picture: Lachie Millard

In nearby Stanthorpe, Jody Patti said that some businesses in the area had warned employees to limit their use of power tools, with fears that sparks could cause another major blaze.

"The thought of a fire starting up again is still in everyone's mind," she said.

"People are a bit more wary now of using power tools or anything because of the chance of them starting a fire," Mrs Patti said.

Extreme water restrictions mean some families are only able to shower three times a week. The lack of rain had really impacted the community's spirit, Mrs Patti said.