Journalist Mel McLaughlin reacts during the uncomfortable interview with cricketer Chris Gayle.
Journalist Mel McLaughlin reacts during the uncomfortable interview with cricketer Chris Gayle.

Renegade Gayle gets hits for six

THE Gympie Times sports reporter Tom Daunt weighs in on the Chris Gayle interview controversy.

 

I DO NOT think there has been a more polarising story this week than that of the now infamous Chris Gayle interview.

Gayle, who has subsequently paid $10,000 for his latest indiscretion, fronted the media during the week to offer what seemed like a sincere apology to not only journalist Mel McLaughlin, but also to the world.

It could be argued, quite successfully I might add, that Gayle's open and very public proposition to McLaughlin was in poor taste, but does the punishment really fit the crime?

Imagine paying $10,000 every time you unsuccessfully asked a member of the opposite sex out.

Now I am not saying that Gayle could not have gone about his romantic offer a different way, but I fail to see how his behaviour was in any way offensive or disrespectful.

McLaughlin, who has since accepted Gayle's apology, has told media outlets during the week she wants to move on and that she was disappointed more than anything with the behaviour of the Melbourne Renegade superstar.

A feeling that has been echoed by the Renegades themselves.

The ABC spoke with Renegades chief executive Stuart Coventry during the week who said that: "There is simply no place for these kinds of comments at the Melbourne Renegades or in the broader community across any sport."

Interestingly enough though, Coventry went on to say that Gayle would not be suspended and would be free to play in all future Big Bash league matches.

What irks me are the doom pundits calling for Gayle's head, suggesting his behaviour is workplace harassment in its purist form.

I can not help but feel we are over-analysing this, and simply put it down to a sportsman thinking with something else other than his brain.