NOT OK: Police have fined a man walking the streets with a gel blaster, warning others it’s not OK to walk around with the toys in public.
NOT OK: Police have fined a man walking the streets with a gel blaster, warning others it’s not OK to walk around with the toys in public.

Residents alarmed by man walking streets with fake gun

POLICE are warning that carrying a gel blaster gun in public may earn you a fine, or worse, could get you charged and prosecuted.

The call comes after a man walking the streets of Caloundra with a "rife looking" gun at the weekend was fined by police, saying toy guns could cause "fear and alarm" within the community.

A witness told to the Daily an armed man walking in Minchinton St, Caloundra about 7.15am Saturday with what appeared to be a rifle.

The woman, who wished to remain anonymous, said she saw the man outside Kronks Motel on her way to work and called police.

"I rang triple-0 but someone else had already seem him as well and police were already on their way," she said.

A Queensland Police Service spokeswoman said police arrived two minutes after the call but it was found to be a fake gun with a brown handle, "maybe a gel blaster".

The man was issued an infringement notice for being a public nuisance.

The spokeswoman warned people to not walk around with toys guns.

She said they could look like authentic firearms, despite only shooting gel balls.

"People think it's OK to walk out with these toys and it scares the living daylights out of others," she said.

Gel ball blasters fire small water balls that hold form while being fires and explode on impact, like paintballs.

In April last year, the Daily reported a teenage boy and two adults were allegedly hit with gel blaster balls in an alleged drive-by shooting in Peregian Springs.

While the victims only suffered minor bruising, Sunshine Coast Child Protection and Investigation Unit detectives arrested an 18-year-old Mt Coolum man for assault.

Possession of gel blasters is not an offence in Queensland, but their misuse is of concern to police and the community.

Detective Senior Sergeant Mick Doogue said people brandishing lookalike guns in public risked causing "fear and alarm among local residents" and being confronted by police if a member of the public called for help.

"If you go out with an intention to cause fear or alarm, like pointing it at people, you can be charged and prosecuted in relation to that offence," Sen-Sgt Doogue said.