Widgee man Frank Robert Huskisson pleaded guilty to possessing spur caps at the Gympie Magistrates Court yesterday.
Widgee man Frank Robert Huskisson pleaded guilty to possessing spur caps at the Gympie Magistrates Court yesterday. Philippe Coquerand

RSPCA closes two year long investigation into cockfighting

THE RSPCA yesterday announced the end of one of its longest and most wide ranging regional investigations.

Operation Spencer was the code name for a probe into the secret blood sport of cockfighting.

And the RSPCA claimed there was a lot more of it going on than most people realised.

It took place across south- east Queensland and came to an end in Gympie Magistrates Court yesterday.

The four spurs located at Frank Robert Huskisson's place.
The four spurs located at Frank Robert Huskisson's place. RSPCA

Widgee man Frank Huskisson was the last to front court on charges linked to the operation, after simultaneous raids by RSPCA inspectors.

The raids led to court appearances in Beenleigh, Ipswich, Caloundra and Gympie.

RSPCA Queensland chief inspector Daniel Young described the investigation as "very protracted” to media outside Gympie Magistrates Court yesterday.

Mr Young said 11 simultaneous warrants were executed in relation to suspected cockfighting activities.

Widgee man Frank Robert Huskisson pleaded guilty to possessing spur caps at the Gympie Magistrates Court yesterday.
Widgee man Frank Robert Huskisson pleaded guilty to possessing spur caps at the Gympie Magistrates Court yesterday. Philippe Coquerand

"Unfortunately cockfighting is an event that is happening more frequently than people think,” he said.

"That's why the RSPCA has dedicated a task force to investigating this type of prohibited event.”

"Essentially cockfighting involves the pitting of two roosters against each other and quite often one or both birds will die.

"It's a barbaric sport that should not happen anywhere - and I use the word 'sport' loosely.”

An RSPCA spokesman said cockfighting events often involved spectators betting.

"Roosters used in fighting often have their natural spurs removed and replaced with sharp blades attached to their legs.

"Fights can last for hours and birds suffer serious injuries and often death.”