DRINK DRIVING: Drivers put their own life and that of others at risk whenever they drink and drive.
DRINK DRIVING: Drivers put their own life and that of others at risk whenever they drink and drive. Max Fleet

Employee sacked for dobbing in boss

A WOMAN has received $2500 in compensation for unfair dismissal after dobbing in her boss for drink driving and sleeping on the job

Tweed Heads worker Hayley Bond was sacked last August, accused of leaking company secrets and making "disparaging comments about the business and the business owner".

Ms Bond was sacked at Andersens Tweed Heads after a series of incidents involving her boss and franchisee, Bob Green.

In a Fair Work Commission (FWC) hearing, Ms Bond alleged Mr Green was slurring his words, seemed confused, forgetful and was unable to walk properly while at work on November 17, 2016.

Ms Bond had worked at the flooring business for two years.
Ms Bond had worked at the flooring business for two years.

"Ms Bond became concerned when Mr Green commenced driving the branded company van to Brunswick Heads to perform a measure and quote. She contacted the head office of Andersens to alert them of her concerns," FWC Commissioner Jennifer Hunt explained.

"A person from Andersens' head office contacted the police. Mr Green was apprehended by police on the road, and to Ms Bond's knowledge, Mr Green lost his driving licence instantly."

When questioned by the commission, Mr Green confirmed he had been stopped by police and recorded a blood alcohol reading of 0.11.

"His licence was suspended in NSW, but on his evidence, he was allowed to continue driving in Queensland," the decision reads.

Mr Green didn't know he had been dobbed in by Ms Bond.

Andersens Tweed Heads took over the franchise in December 2017.
Andersens Tweed Heads took over the franchise in December 2017.

On July 4, when Mr Green went to the bank, Ms Bond again contacted head office.

"She informed (head office) that she considered Mr Green was drunk on work premises, and stated that this made her feel uncomfortable and unsafe," the decision reads.

The chief executive officer of the group told her he would drive from Brisbane to Tweed to investigate, Ms Bond told the commission.

"When Mr Green returned from the bank he proceeded to the sofa in the kitchenette area and slept for approximately two hours. Ms Bond took a picture of him on her phone and sent the picture by text to (the CEO)."

"(The CEO) attended the premises at approximately 3.30pm that day. Mr Green's wife was contacted to pick him up and drive him home."

A month later, Mr Green called a staff meeting and told them there was a violation of the whistleblower employment code and head office of the flooring business was "aiming to close this store down".

Mr Green gave strict instructions that anything said at the meeting should not leave the room.

A week later Ms Bond was sacked after she allegedly told a contract carpet installer that head office was closing down the store.

Mr Green gave evidence that the contract carpet cleaner told him that Ms Bond was the leak.

Evidence from the contract carpet cleaner exposed holes in Mr Green's reason for sacking Ms Bond.

The contractor said he overhead "the two Tracys" talking about the business closing down while they were in the back room.

"Hayley Bond wasn't there. Bob Green wasn't there. There was only the two Tracys," he told the commission.

Commissioner Hunt said Ms Bond should be paid $2565 because she was unfairly dismissed as there was not enough evidence to prove she leaked information from the staff meeting and by contacting head office about Mr Green she did not breach company rules.