Star cricketer’s brother quizzed over fake terror plot

Cricketer Usman Khawaja (right) pictured with his brother Arsalan, who has been questioned as part of a terror investigation. Picture: Facebook
Cricketer Usman Khawaja (right) pictured with his brother Arsalan, who has been questioned as part of a terror investigation. Picture: Facebook

THE brother of Test cricketer Usman Khawaja has been pulled over and taken for questioning in relation to an ongoing NSW Joint Counter Terrorism Team investigation.

Arsalan Khawaja's arrest relates to documents allegedly found on University of NSW grounds in August this year purporting to contain plans to facilitate terrorism attacks.

He has been taken to Parramatta Police Area Command where he will be spoken to in relation to alleged attempt to pervert justice, and forgery making a false document.

Khawaja was previously questioned by police in October as part of an investigation into a university notebook which included faked plans for a terror attack.

Mohamed Kamer Nilar Nizamdeen, who owned the notebook, has been fully cleared after initially being wrongly arrested and charged in August with knowingly making a document connected to terrorism.

He was refused bail and spent four weeks in Goulburn's Supermax prison before the charge was withdrawn in Central Local Court on Friday.

Assistant Commissioner Mick Willing said police had paid for Nizamdeen's court costs and "felt very sorry for him".

Assistant Police Commissioner Mick Willing speaks in Sydney.
Assistant Police Commissioner Mick Willing speaks in Sydney.

He said they will be alleging he was "set up in a planned and calculated manner in a personal grievance over a woman.

"The person who is responsible for what occurred to him is the person we're alleging manufactured this document," he said.

Police are still trying to confirm who wrote the disturbing material, which mentioned targeting former prime minister Malcolm Turnbull and foreign minister Julie Bishop.

The notebook was found in a drawer in Nizamdeen's desk at UNSW, where he worked in IT after graduating with a commerce degree, and where he is regarded as a model for foreign students.

It is also where Khawaja worked, having settled in Australia as a child after his family relocated from Pakistan.