BIG SAW: Gympie Woodworks Museum will be home to one of the largest bandsaws ever used in Australia.
BIG SAW: Gympie Woodworks Museum will be home to one of the largest bandsaws ever used in Australia. Contributed

Town bands together to see a saw

GYMPIE Woodworks Museum will be home to one of the largest bandsaws ever used in Australia, thanks to the contributions of its past and present owners.

The large scale installation process is under way.

It will be displayed in a purpose built, elevated shed and officially dedicated by Hyne Timber board director Chris Hyne at Woodwork's Open Day and 30th birthday celebrations on Saturday, October 4.

Hyne Timber CEO Jon Kleinschmidt is pleased to partner with the Woodworks Museum to share such a significant artefact from Queensland's timber industry with the community.

"Hyne Timber has been in the business for 132 years to date, and this saw represents a significant proportion of that history, both for the company and the local industry," he said.

"The technology has evolved, the timber has changed, but right across five generations we have helped realise the Australian family dream by developing quality timber products."

Plantation softwood pine logs have replaced hardwood to produce the structural, industrial and engineered timber products.

Mr Kleinschmidt said that was why it was important to remember how the timber industry began.

"The preservation of this bandsaw is about capturing the history of the local timber industry and sharing it with our local community," he said.

"Timber remains one of Wide Bay's biggest industries in terms of employment and economic stimulus, and we're proud to be part of that."

Operating in Hyne & Son Maryborough sawmill, the saw cut Fraser Island hardwood up until 1978.

Private Forestry Service Queensland executive officer, Sean Ryan said the scale of the machine was extraordinary, even for people in the industry.

"This historical piece of machinery stands at 6m high, so the relocation and installation is a huge project in itself," he said.

"We thank Hyne Timber for their partnership and contribution of $20,000 towards the relocation of the saw to its new home at Woodworks Museum."

The saw was donated by owner of the former Hyne & Son hardwood mill, while DTM and Gympie Regional Council donated the Tozer Park depot sheds which are being restructured by Private Forestry Service Queensland.