kids playing with puzzle, education concept
kids playing with puzzle, education concept

Unqualified ‘nannies’ offering cheap childcare

NEWLY unemployed workers are using classifieds websites and outsourcing apps to find work looking after children with no qualifications or experience.

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The Australian Nanny Association has warned parents against hiring unqualified people as thousands who have lost jobs due to coronavirus look to find any work they can.

ANA president Lauren Brown said there had been a rise in families looking for nannies, but also a rise in non-qualified people offering cheap services.

"Parents who are looking for help around the home should be looking for people with a blue card, first aid and CPR certificate, more than two years working with children and I would advise them to call references," she said.

Ms Brown also urged parents to find nannies using approved agencies rather than apps to find someone to look after their children.

But Ms Brown said other professional nannies had lost work as families reduce spending and minimise their interaction outside their house.

"What we are experiencing right now is a large amount of professional nannies losing their jobs as parents face uncertainty about their own work," she said.

The Federal Government has yet to deem nannies non-essential and prevent them from working.

Ms Brown said the association was encouraging nannies to only work for one family and avoid public transport.

 

 

"We are encouraging everyone to have the right conversations about the risks each party is bringing into the home," she said.

"At the moment we are encouraging nannies to online work for one family and to avoid public transport where possible."

Federal Education Minister Dan Tehan this week urged childcare centres to remain open.

"I am working with the sector to minimise the impact of COVID-19, and we already have implemented additional support arrangements," he said.

Ms Brown said nannies were able to provide child care for essential workers who are unable to work from home.

But she said the association was encouraging nannies to only work for one family, avoid travelling on public transport and self-isolate away from work.

"We are encouraging everyone to have the right conversations about the risks each party is bringing into the home," Ms Brown said.

"At the moment we are encouraging nannies to online work for one family and to avoid public transport where possible."

 

 

 

 

Originally published as Unqualified 'nannies' offering cheap childcare