Fire engulfed a semi-trailer loaded with cane hay on the Isis Highway about 2km north of Coalstoun Lakes at 2.40pm.
Fire engulfed a semi-trailer loaded with cane hay on the Isis Highway about 2km north of Coalstoun Lakes at 2.40pm. Alex Treacy

Update: Truck being cleared after Isis Highway inferno

Update 8pm: The semi-trailer which burst into flames on the Isis Highway at about 2.40pm this afternoon is in the process of being moved.

Gayndah fire captain Ron Mitchell said the highway "should be open by now” after what was a "lengthy job”.

The semi-trailer's load of hay has been pushed to the side of the road and Capt Mitchell said it could "smoulder for days”.

"You just can't put it out,” he said.

Emergency services ended up closing the Isis Highway between Biggenden and Ban Ban Springs, while vehicles which had been caught up either side of the accident were allowed past the scene of the accident every hour or so.

Earlier: A truckie has had a lucky escape this afternoon after his semi-trailer loaded with hay burst into flames on the Isis Highway between Biggenden and Coalstoun Lakes at about 2.40pm.

The incident occurred 2km north of Coalstoun Lakes outside of By-Mingo Droughtmasters Stud.

The truck driver was uninjured.

He said he was travelling from Bundaberg "out west” but declined to comment further about the incident.

Crews from Gayndah and Biggenden are still on the scene and traffic is banked up on the Isis Highway in both directions.

Gayndah Fire Station captain Ron Mitchell said the fire was "well involved” by the time crews arrived on scene.

The fire on the truck's body has mostly been extinguished, but the load of what the Times understands is cane hay continues to burn.

"Our biggest problem now is getting the hay off because that will just continue to burn so we've got to get a machine to get that off,” Capt Mitchell said.

"Until we get that (hay) off, we could be here for hours... could be one, could be five (hours).”

Grazier Don Roberton, owner of the stud outside which the incident occurred, said he was alerted to the fire by a woman who entered his property from the highway.

He called 000 and alongside several other local producers, helped keep the blaze contained by extinguishing small fires on the highway shoulder which ignited as burning hay blew off the semi-trailer.

An emergency services officer said the driver relayed to her that the fire began in the engine, but Capt Mitchell was unable to confirm how the fire began.