Sarina resident Alan Kochevatkin said changes to how 1080 baits are monitored would save the lives of domestic and working dogs. PICTURE: ZOE PHILLIPS
Sarina resident Alan Kochevatkin said changes to how 1080 baits are monitored would save the lives of domestic and working dogs. PICTURE: ZOE PHILLIPS

Victory in mission to contain poison epidemic

THERE is no question in Sarina resident Alan Kochevatkin's mind that a review into the use of the common agricultural poison 1080 will save lives.

When Mr Kochevatkin's mastiff-great dane cross Ziggy ate some of the poisoned baits, he said his dog suffered a long, agonising death.

Ziggy's death, along with the death of other beloved pet dogs in the Sarina, St Lawrence and Carmila regions, led to Mr Kochevatkin launching a petition in May calling for a review into the poisons.

On Friday, Health Minister Steven Miles announced the government would answer the petition's calls and review the 1080 exclusions zones and introduce community awareness programs.

Mr Miles said the 1080 bait review would work in close consultation with the community, as well as agricultural industry groups.

Mr Kochevatkin said he was celebrating the announcement as a victory, but said the fight was not over.

"It shows they're taking it seriously and assessing it on its honest merits," he said.

"They're on the verge of - hopefully - being restored to how it (the poison controls) was before".

 

Pest controller and Mirani MP Stephen Andrew said the announcement would provide solace to anyone who had lost their beloved pet to the poison. Photo: Daryl Wright
Pest controller and Mirani MP Stephen Andrew said the announcement would provide solace to anyone who had lost their beloved pet to the poison. Photo: Daryl Wright

 

Pest controller and Mirani MP Stephen Andrew said the announcement would provide solace to anyone who had lost their beloved pet to the poison.

"How many dogs have suffered and died?" he asked.

Mr Andrew was the sponsoring member to the petition and said the changes would protect both domestic pets, and native animals who he said were too often accidentally poisoned.