Angus Hopkins, from Nobby needs a new wheelchair but NDIS keeps stalling. His mother uses a wheelbarrow to move him around outside. April 2019
Angus Hopkins, from Nobby needs a new wheelchair but NDIS keeps stalling. His mother uses a wheelbarrow to move him around outside. April 2019 Bev Lacey

Wheelbarrow boy's new chair approved, but questions remain

THE Toowoomba region boy with cerebral palsy forced to use a wheelbarrow on his family's property has finally had his new $26,000 motorised wheelchair approved by the National Disability Insurance Scheme.

In a win for people power, Nobby nine-year-old Angus Hopkins will finally be able to move independently after his story captured the nation's attention this week.

The front page story in Tuesday's edition of The Chronicle turned into a massive media circus yesterday, with Angus' mother Jody Ezzy heaping pressure on the NDIS to approve the chair.

But after being told it could take two years to get the equipment, Ms Ezzy said an NDIS representative informed her the chair had been signed off.

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"I still don't have anything in writing (but) they told me on the phone (this morning) the chair had been approved," she said.

But that wasn't the response Ms Ezzy said she received about noon yesterday, with the NDIS telling her another quote would be needed as well as extra tests and assessments.

This was contrary to earlier releases the organisation sent out to media outlets, informing newspapers and television stations it had approved the chair.

Ms Ezzy was ruthless in her assessment of the NDIS' behaviour.

"(The NDIS) made me look like I'm sensationalising it," she said.

"I've just lost all faith in the NDIS, to try and shut us down with lies.

Long wait for wheelchair: Angus Hopkins
Long wait for wheelchair: Angus Hopkins

"I'm exhausted, having to keep fighting. To get a call back required throwing a tantrum again."

Angus' story captured the attention of thousands of ordinary people, who offered money and equipment to help him.

But Ms Ezzy said the fact a media frenzy was required to get the chair approved proved the system needed fixing.

"The fact it has taken a massive media circus to get anything done is disgraceful," she said.

"Tuesday morning was crazy (with the response) - it probably shows how many disillusioned people there are out there. It's obviously resonated.

"We could've bought this chair five times over (with donations), but that was never the point.

"We're not asking for charity - this system was set up for people like Angus.

"We're asking the NDIS to stand up and do its job."