The latest poll result shows Opposition Leader Bill Shorten is a significant drag on the Labor Party vote. Picture: AAP /James Ross
The latest poll result shows Opposition Leader Bill Shorten is a significant drag on the Labor Party vote. Picture: AAP /James Ross

Poll shows Shorten a Labor liability

QUEENSLANDERS have brutally and decisively repudiated Bill Shorten and his key tax policies, handing the Coalition the ammunition it needs to hold onto marginal seats.

In a shocking result for Labor, 40 per cent of Queenslanders say they are less likely to vote for the ALP because Mr Shorten is the Opposition Leader, an exclusive YouGov Galaxy poll taken for The Courier-Mail reveals.

However, Queenslanders have also slightly turned off Scott Morrison, underscoring the fight both parties face at stopping their vote leaking to vanity parties.

Mr Shorten's net score of -25 per cent signals the Opposition Leader is a significant drag on the Labor Party vote.

And Labor's plan to reap billions of dollars from an overhaul to franking credits for self-funded retirees and negative gearing is costing Mr Shorten votes in the state he needs to win.

A whopping 46 per cent of respondents have revealed taking away the cash refund at tax time on Australian shares now makes them less likely to vote Labor. Thirteen per cent say it makes them more likely to vote Labor and 36 per cent say it will not influence their vote. The outcomes leaves the policy with a net negative score of -33 per cent.

Labor's policy to scrap negative gearing - except on new homes - has also proved unpopular. Thirty-eight per cent of respondents say it makes them less likely to vote Labor, although 37 per cent say it will not influence their vote. Nineteen per cent of Queensland respondents support the policy and has attracted them to voting for Labor. The policy has a net negative score of -19 per cent.

The poll, taken of 810 voters on Wednesday and Thursday last week, shows that despite having an unpopular leader and unpopular policies, Labor's primary vote has not shifted from 34 per cent - the same as August and November polls.

However, the Coalition's primary vote has dropped three points from November to 35 per cent, which has handed Labor a victory on two-party-preferred terms at 52-48.

Clive Palmer's United Australia Party is stealing the Coalition's soft voters.

Queenslanders have also softened on the change of Coalition leadership last August.

Initially, the change was embraced by voters in Queensland. In November, 29 per cent of voters said they were more likely to vote for the LNP and 25 per cent less likely to vote for the party, which was a net positive score of 4 per cent.

But the mood is shifting, with the leadership change viewed more negatively. When asked about Scott Morrison as leader rather than Malcolm Turnbull, 30 per cent say they are more likely to vote for the LNP (up from 29 per cent in November), 33 per cent are less likely to vote for the LNP (up from 25 per cent in November) and 34 per cent say it will not influence their vote (it was 42 per cent in November). It is a net score of -3 per cent.